I adore oral history. One of my favorite things about traveling as much as I do is having the opportunity to talk to locals about where they live; I am continuously fascinated by the relationships that people have to the rich history of their communities.  Sitting in her living room and listening to Marie-Eve recount some of Quebec’s modern history, I found Montréal to be an increasingly inspiring place in which to work on the newest Female Condom animations. While I am not able to share any of our work-in-progress, you will have the opportunity to see the fruits of our labor circa summer 2010…

C'est magnifique

C'est magnifique

The Quiet Revolution is the name given to the period of 1960 through 1966 in Quebec history. The term was coined by a Canadian journalist who, upon witnessing the many and far reaching changes taking place in Quebec, declared that this was nothing short of a revolution – albeit a quiet one.

As Claude Bélanger wrote, “The period was also marked by intense social change. In the 1960’s, Quebec, indeed the world, was agitated by powerful currents of change. Liberal and leftist forces everywhere questioned the social order that had been accepted for so long. The current of decolonisation and the movement for civil rights made social and national inequities increasingly difficult to accept.”

"Masters on our premises"

"Masters on our premises"

The first major change that took place during The Quiet Revolution was the large-scale rejection of past values, including what were considered to be the three main components of French Canadian thought: agriculturalism, anti-statism and messianism.  In these respects, Quebec entered adamantly into a phase of modernisation.  Society’s outlook became more secular (as opposed to religious), and much of the traditionalism that had previously characterized the Canadian province was replaced by progressive, liberal attitudes; long standing proclivities such as high rates of marriage, birth and fertility were suddenly reversed.  Only nationalism continued with any vigour in the period of The Quiet Revolution, although in a significantly altered form.

In the words of Claude Bélanger, “However much it may be challenged today in its assumptions and contributions, the Quiet Revolution was a high point of Quebec History. It was a fantastic time to be young, to have ideas and ideals, to be alive, to wish to do things, to want to improve the world, to be a Québécois.”

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